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dc.contributor.authorThe Lake Michigan Interstate Pesticides Committee of the Lake Michigan Enforcement Conference
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-01T17:36:13Z
dc.date.available2011-04-01T17:36:13Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-01T17:36:13Z
dc.identifier.otherEPA-R3-72-003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11045/20863
dc.descriptionAppendices: I - Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides in Lake Michigan Waters II - Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides in Lake Michigan Tributary Waters III - Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides in Biological Monitors IV - Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides in Lake Michigan Fish V - Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides in Municipal Wastewater Effluents VI - Industrial Wastewater Evaluation of PCBs in Lake Michigan VII - Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides in Stream Sediments VIII - Five State Pesticide Legislation; Appendix I Lake Michigan Basin Office Open Lake Sample Stations; Appendix II Lake Michigan Basin Major River Pesticide Sampling Stations; Appendix III Indiana Biological Pesticide Monitoring Stations - Indiana State Board of Healthen_US
dc.description.abstractThe presence of pesticides and particularly the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides in Lake Michigan water is responsible for biological accumulations that affect a wide variety of legitimate uses. The data collected from waters, wastewaters, invertebrate organisms and fish all suggest that DDT plus analogs and dieldrin are observed consistently at levels that warrant concern from both a public health and wildlife preservation standpoint. The sources of these chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides include not only industrial and wastewater effluents but also diffuse sources such as from agricultural activities and municipal pest control programs. The evaluation of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides in both wastewater and biological specimens is complicated by the presence of products such as polychlorinated biphenyls and phthalates. These products interfere with the analysis for the target insecticide and, indeed, have biological implications of their own. This report is submitted in fulfillment of four cooperative grants to the Lake Michigan Enforcement Conference participating state under the sponsorship of the Environmental Protection Agency and include grant numbers 16050 EYV (Wisconsin), 16050 EYS (Indiana), 16050 EFV (Michigan) and 16050 ESP (Illinois) for an investigation of "Evaluation of Pesticide Sources and Levels Tributary to lake Michigan".en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Lake Michigan Interstate Pesticides Committee of the Lake Michigan Enforcement Conference;No. 16050 EYV, EYS, EPV, ESP
dc.subjectBiological Monitoringen_US
dc.subjectFish Monitoringen_US
dc.subjectLake Michiganen_US
dc.subjectLegislationen_US
dc.subjectPesticide Monitoringen_US
dc.subjectChlorinated Hydrocarbon Contaminationen_US
dc.subjectWater Samplingen_US
dc.subjectDDTen_US
dc.subjectDieldrinen_US
dc.titleAn Evaluation of DDT and Dieldrin in Lake Michigan, 1972en_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US


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