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dc.contributor.authorStrommen, N. D.
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T18:16:11Z
dc.date.available2014-05-29T18:16:11Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11045/24148
dc.descriptionPartial OCR done. 34 pages total.en_US
dc.description.abstractEarly season snowfall often creates special problems when preparations for the winter season have not been completed. The first snowfall of the season for Michigan, on the average, arrives five weeks earlier in the western section of the Upper Peninsula than it does in the southeastern portion of the Lower Peninsula. Preparations for the winter snow season may take only a few minutes for some types of activity while others may need three to four weeks. The importance of being prepared is directly related to the influence which an activity may have to the smooth operation of a community. The snow removal program is an activity which must be prepared for action when that first substantial snowfall occurs. Snow removal must operate smoothly to avoid snarling the traffic of everyday activities. Winter sports and recreational facilities are an example of an operation which requires a substantial period of preparation. Uncompleted preparations, however, only represent a loss to the operator and do not interfere with the smooth operation of everyday activities. Other activities, such as advertising, depend on timeliness for success. These people must plan well in advance so that their product release coincides with the changing seasons. Certain types of outdoor construction work will be scheduled so that it can be completed before inclimate weather sets in. Frost and frost depth penetration are closely related to the snow cover depth. Insect survival is generally much higher in areas with an abundant early snow cover. Because of the large time variations between the western Upper Peninsula and the southeastern Lower Peninsula in the threshold dates for various snow depths, the timely completion of preparations for winter vary widely in Michigan. Data presented in this publication are designed to provide helpful information for planning the timely completion of winter preparedness operations. These data also point out vividly the effect that certain topographic features in Michigan have on winter snowfall patterns and the influence of the surrounding Great Lakes.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectMichigan Snowfallen_US
dc.subjectSnowfall Statisticsen_US
dc.subjectMichigan Department of Agricultureen_US
dc.subjectMichigan Weather Serviceen_US
dc.subjectESSA - Weather Bureauen_US
dc.subjectUnited States Department of Commerceen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural Engineering Department Michigan State Universityen_US
dc.subjectJune 1968en_US
dc.titleMichigan Snowfall Statistics: First 1- / 3- / 6- / 12- Inch Depthsen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US


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